Human rights training in Thailand on church-based advocacy

By agency reporter
18 Oct 2012

As violations of human rights and human dignity are on the increase in Asian countries, selected representatives of Asian churches will take part in a regional human rights training seminar in Thailand.

The training will focus on global and regional ecumenical advoacy for the human rights and human dignity of marginalised people and communities in Asia.

The event will take place from 21 to 25 October 2012 in Bangkok, Thailand.

Organised by the Commission of the Churches on International Affairs (CCIA) of the World Council of Churches (WCC) in cooperation with the Christian Conference of Asia, the training will provide in-depth analysis on human rights principles from philosophical, historic, cultural, biblical and theological perspectives, especially in the regional contexts of Asia.

The training will also introduce participants to human rights instruments and protection mechanisms. Specific human rights issues in Asia will also be brought to the table such as rule of law, militarisation, religious freedom and rights of religious minorities.

In addition to sessions on torture, enforced disappearances, rights of domestic migrant workers and militarisation, there will be sessions focused on rights of women and children.

“As the emerging trends pose serious threats to the human rights and human dignity of millions of people in Asia today, the efforts of churches need to be enhanced to uphold the human rights of all God’s people, especially countering the forces of evil and darkness which need to be recognised,” said Dr Mathews George Chunakara, director of the CCIA.

Similar human rights trainings are organised by the CCIA in various regions in collaboration with the regional ecumenical councils.

These programmes assist churches to enhance their capacities in advocacy, the organisers say.

The World Counci of Churches has been committed to promoting human rights since the WCC First Assembly in 1948.

[Ekk/3]

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