Quaker UN Organisation recognised as influential on armed violence reduction

By agency reporter
3 Jul 2013

The Quaker United Nations Office (QUNO) has been named as one of the 100 most influential global actors in armed violence reduction.

The accolade was given by Action On Armed Violence, (one of the leading organisations in the area), and comes as recognition of the work done by Quakers to put this issue on the UN agenda.

QUNO is accompanied in the list by international figures such as Kofi Annan, Angelina Jolie and the Dalai Lama. “Like Quakers in general, we tend not to publicise our work but instead just get on and do it”, said Diane Hendrick, associate representative for peace and disarmament at QUNO’s Geneva office. “However, we are glad to be recognised by others and we hope this will help us further increase our effectiveness as we continue.”

Andrew Tomlinson and Jonathan Woolley, directors of the QUNO New York and Geneva offices respectively, were the named individuals on the list. However, Andrew was clear that they were representing many colleagues. “QUNO staff have been working on this issue for decades, in Geneva and New York”, he said. “We’ve supported negotiations on disarmament, advocated for local perspectives in peacebuilding, upheld the need for reconciliation and dialogue and researched links between violence and development.”

The Quaker United Nations Office, based in Geneva and New York, has been representing the concerns of Quakers to the UN since 1948. It works on areas including: prevention of violent conflict, peacebuilding, human rights & refugees, food & sustainability and the human impacts of climate change.

[Ekk/4]

Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 England & Wales License. Although the views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent the views of Ekklesia, the article may reflect Ekklesia's values. If you use Ekklesia's news briefings please consider making a donation to sponsor Ekklesia's work here.