Eight in ten voters think government is failing to deal with unemployment

Eight in ten voters think government is failing to deal with unemployment

By agency reporter
17 Jul 2013

Over four-fifths (82 per cent) of UK voters think the government has failed to tackle unemployment effectively, according to a new poll published today (17 July) by the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC).

The survey of 1,000 UK adults - released ahead of the first joint G20 labour and finance ministers meeting in Moscow this week - also reveals that the majority of the British electorate feel that ministers have prioritised business interests over workers' rights and have failed to take any meaningful action against tax avoidance.

The research, carried out by pollsters TNS, shows that almost two-thirds (65 per cent) of voters think that Britain's employment laws do not offer enough job security, with nearly seven in ten (68 per cent) claiming they are being overworked.

The ITUC poll also reveals that nine in ten (90 per cent) voters would like to see taxes increased for large multi-national companies.

Commenting on the findings, TUC Assistant General Secretary Paul Nowak, who will attend the meeting in Russia, said: "This survey shows how out of touch ministers are. Rather than listening to the siren calls of big business, and launching a wave of attacks on people at work, the government should be putting in place a plan that brings jobs and growth back to our economy.

"Watering down employment protections is not going to achieve this. What the UK and Europe urgently need is investment in infrastructure to create decent jobs and get people back into work.

"The UK government must heed voters' calls for stronger action on tax avoidance. At a time when millions of families are seeing their bills rise and living standards plummet, multi-national companies must not be let off the tax hook."

[Ekk/4]

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