Environmental transport policies cutting road deaths

Environmental transport policies cutting road deaths

By agency reporter
13 Nov 2013

Accidents on Brighton and Hove’s roads have fallen by a substantial 12.5 per cent as a result of green policies, according to a major survey by the Department for Transport.

At the same time, accidents across the South East fell by just one per cent and in England as a whole by only five per cent. And this is despite the fact that Brighton and Hove's population is rising rapidly, with more people than ever before using the city's streets.

At a time when the Green Party of England and Wales' flagship road policies are coming under fire from motorists' and taxi drivers' campaigns such as Unchain the Motorist, the survey provides substantial government evidence that such policies are actually working.

There are now one in eight fewer accidents than before the Green administration in Brighton and Hove launched its transport initiative and a much higher drop in accidents than seen nationally or across the region.

Lead member for transport, Councillor Ian Davey, who has championed the Greens' initiatives since day one, commented: "This survey proves in black and white what we have been saying since we took office: we are introducing policies that make the roads of Brighton and Hove healthier and safer.

"Pro-motorist campaigners want us to roll back time and return to the transport policies of the last administration. But do they also want more accidents on our roads each year? Because that's what a roll-back would mean.

"Our streets are now safer. Sometimes people claim that Greens are anti-car. We are not anti-car but we are for safer streets for everyone. And that's what this survey demonstrates we are achieving"

The survey result comes four months after it was revealed that the city's roadside air quality had also improved markedly over two years.

[Ekk/3]

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