Human rights 65 years after the Universal Declaration

Abstract

On 10 December 1948 the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Yet 65 years later, human rights abuses are still widespread. Faith groups and other people of goodwill have much to do if “recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family” is to be achieved. This Ekklesia briefing by Savitri Hensman looks at how human rights are defended and extended, not least from a faith perspective, and what they mean for us in a changing, globalised world. Reference is made specifically to UK-related issues, including poverty and disability.

On 10 December 1948 the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Yet 65 years later, human rights abuses are still widespread. Faith groups and other people of goodwill have much to do if “recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family” is to be achieved.

This Ekklesia briefing by Savitri Hensman looks at how human rights are defended and extended, not least from a faith perspective, and what they mean for us in a changing, globalised world. Reference is made specifically to UK-related issues, including poverty and disability.

CONTENTS

1. Introduction
2. Developing the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
3. People of faith and human rights
4. Human rights in today’s world [including UK issues]
5. Defending human rights more effectively
6. Nelson Mandela’s hope
7. Ekklesia-published reports with human rights implications
8. Some further reading
About the author

* Read and download the full briefing here (*.PDF Adobe Acrobat document, 9pp, 172kb): http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/files/human_rights_65_years_after.pdf