Student Christian Movement mourn change-making theologian's death

Student Christian Movement mourn change-making theologian's death

By staff writers
23 Apr 2014

The Student Christian Movement has expressed sadness at the death last week of writer and theologian Jim Cotter.

An Anglican priest who made a huge contribution to the thinking and practice of contemporary spirituality, linked to social justice concerns and the role, status and dignity of LGBT people in the church, Cotter, an Anglican priest, passed away peacefully in his home in Llandudno after a brave struggle with cancer.

Jim Cotter latterly ministered to householders and visitors in the parish of Aberdaron, in northwest Wales.

He was a prolific writer of prayers and reflections, which were published through Cairns Publications in partnership with the Canterbury Press.

"His thoughts were an inspiration to countless Christians, and he will be greatly missed," SCM said in its tribute.

Cotter also contributed his thoughts to Movement, the SCM magazine, among many other publications.

The following extract is taken from 'Walking with Questions: Jim Cotter on pilgrimage', Movement Issue 137, Spring 2011:

Around Aberdaron I can make an eight mile walk, to the very tip of the Lleyn Peninsula, imagining that each mile represents ten years of my life. I stop every mile and ponder the previous decade… Every human being has a lifeline, and every life is worth pondering. And letting the questions expand inside ourselves may be a way into faith in our time.

Try it where you live. Mark out a trail. Invite walkers from every one of the eight decades. Share memories. Listen to those who are way out ahead. Speak to them of your hopes for the future. It’s a very pilgrim kind of way of spending a day out. And be expectant of surprise.

* 'Easter, Jim Cotter and R. S. Thomas: silent etchings and torn reason', by Simon Barrow. http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/node/20433

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