German court to hear evidence from Yemeni drone victim

By agency reporter
April 21, 2015

A court in Germany to take evidence from a Yemeni victim of the US secret drone programme in the wake of revelations that military bases on German soil play a key role in the strikes.

Faisal bin Ali Jaber, an environmental engineer from Sana’a who lost two relatives to a 2012 drone strike, has won the right to give evidence next month, as part of a constitutional claim filed in Germany.

The claim, filed in October last year by international human rights organisation Reprieve and its German partner, the European Centre for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR), seeks measures by the German administration to stop the use of German territory for illegal actions by the US in Yemen. They argue that the German government is acting in breach of the German constitution by allowing the US to use its air base at Ramstein for illegal drone attacks abroad.

Mr Jaber lost his brother-in-law Salim – a preacher – andhis nephew Waleed – a local police officer – to a US drone strike on the village of Khashamir on 29 August 2012. Salim often spoke out against extremism, and had used a sermon just days before he was killed to urge his congregation to reject Al Qaeda.

The case represents the first time that a court in a country which provides support to the US drone programme will hear from one of its civilian victims. The US’ campaign of drone strikes – carried out in secret by the CIA and U.S. Special Forces – has come in for widespread criticism due to a lack of transparency and accountability. Many legal experts have argued that it violates both domestic and international law, while humanitarians have warned of the large number of civilians killed in the strikes.

Kat Craig, Legal Director at Reprieve and Mr bin Ali Jaber’s lawyer, said: “This is a crucial step in efforts to gain accountability for the civilian victims of secret US drone strikes. It also highlights that the US is not alone in this campaign – support is quietly provided by allies including Germany and the UK. Faisal’s story demonstrates how the misguided drone programme is not simply unacceptable, but deeply counterproductive. Not only is it killing civilians; it has even killed the very people who should be our allies in fighting extremism. Let’s hope this marks the start of some long overdue scrutiny of a programme characterised by secrecy.”

Andreas Schüller, Mr bin Ali Jaber’s attorney at ECCHR, said: “Germany must now take effective measures to stop the US from using Ramstein airbase for combat drone missions.”

* Reprieve http://www.reprieve.org.uk/

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