Public generosity to foodbanks must be matched by urgent policy changes, says charity

By agency reporter
February 26, 2020

As new figures reveal the level of generosity from the public to food banks in the run up to last Christmas, the Trussell Trust is calling on the government to end the five week wait for Universal Credit.

New figures released today (26 February 2020) show 3,072 tonnes of food were donated to food banks in the Trussell Trust’s network in December 2019, as donations from the public kept pace with the increased need for emergency food seen last year.

The sheer amount of food donated comes against a backdrop of soaring need for food banks across the UK as more and more people are locked into poverty due to low benefit incomes, benefit delays and changes to benefits being paid.  Although Universal Credit is not the only benefit payment people at food banks experience problems with, one of the key issues forcing people to food banks is the five week wait for a first Universal Credit payment.

A recent YouGov survey found that half of the UK public has taken action to address hunger and its causes in the last 12 months, with more than a third donating food to a food bank. The Trussell Trust is asking the new government to match the public’s commitment to stopping people going hungry by playing its part and sticking to its manifesto pledge to 'do more to make sure Universal Credit works for the most vulnerable'. 

The charity is calling on the new Chancellor to use the forthcoming Budget on March 11 to ensure that the benefits system can support people who need it by:

  • Ending the five week wait for Universal Credit
  • Ensuring benefit payments cover the cost of living
  • Investing in local emergency support for people in crisis

 Emma Revie, chief executive of the Trussell Trust, said: “Food banks were truly overwhelmed by the level of generosity from the public in the run up to Christmas. These donations show communities and individuals, driven by compassion and justice, are doing what they can to help people facing hunger, but no charity can replace the dignity of having enough money to buy your own food.

“We know this can change. It’s now time for our new Chancellor to do his part in the forthcoming Budget and match these acts of compassion by doing the right thing and putting money back into the pockets of people who most need support. 

“It’s in our power as a country to end the need for food banks. To reach that future, we need to make sure everyone has enough money for the essentials. The government’s first priority must be ensuring our benefits system anchors us all from the rising tide of poverty by ending the five week wait for Universal Credit.”

While the amount of food donated allowed food banks to support increasing numbers of people, the Trussell Trust is also asking the public to check what items their local food bank is most in need of and to donate all year round to ensure vital support is available to local people in crisis, no matter the time of year.

Figures from the Trussell Trust cannot be used to fully explain the scale of food bank use across the UK, because figures relate to food banks in the Trussell Trust’s network and not to the hundreds of independent food banks. There are more than 1,200 food bank centres in the Trussell Trust’s network across the UK – research from the Independent Food Aid Network shows there are at least 817 independent food banks, so the Trussell Trust network accounts for roughly two-thirds of all food banks.

* Trussell Trust https://www.trusselltrust.org/

[Ekk/6]

Although the views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent the views of Ekklesia, the article may reflect Ekklesia's values. If you use Ekklesia's news briefings please consider making a donation to sponsor Ekklesia's work here.