Ethical household spending can tackle global poverty says C of E specialist

Ethical household spending can tackle global poverty says C of E specialist

By staff writers
19 Sep 2007

Applying Christian ideas to handling money could reduce the UK’s consumer debt crisis, keep mortgage payments down, and help tackle global poverty, according to a new booklet by a Church of England specialist on personal finance and giving.

Researched and compiled by John Preston, the Church of England’s National Stewardship and Resources Officer, The Money Revolution contains 64 pages of easy-to-read financial wisdom, featuring chapters on spending, saving, pensions, budgets, giving, insurance, credit, debt, making a will, and more.

"Average UK income will put you in the 10 per cent richest people on the planet, so how we handle our money has real significance," explains John, “but with UK personal debt increasing at £1 million every four minutes, there is a real need for us all to think again about being content with what we have and need, rather than chasing what we have not got and don't need."

Having concluded that some debt is an inevitable part of life for many people, John is keen to emphasise that The Money Revolution is not just for people interested in debt issues - as it is a useful resource for personal ethical financial reviews, group discussions, and sermons and talks.

"If every UK household gave away five per cent of their income, we could eliminate poverty globally, educate every child on earth and provide water and sanitation for all,” he says on the need for such a resource. “The booklet shows how we can use our own finances to make a difference through what we spend, how we save, and how we give."

Retailing at £3 with discounts for ordering multiple copies (£2 per copy for 10 to 49 copies, £1 per copy for orders of 50 or more), The Money Revolution, published by Authentic Media, can be purchased online at www.themoneyrevolution.net or via Christian bookshops

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