Seminary sculptures confront war, torture and suffering

By staff writers
8 May 2008

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An installation of sculptures responding to the horrors of war, particularly the ongoing war in Iraq, is on display at Union Theological Seminary in New York City until 16 May 2008. It is the work of priest and artist Thomas Faulkner.

The War Series is placed in public spaces throughout the seminary's campus (Broadway and 121st Street in Manhattan). Faulkner's work confronts the challenging issues of violence, torture, and the legacy of suffering from continuing conflicts.

The creator of the installation has maintained a dual vocation as a priest and sculptor since his ordination in 1974. Prior to ordination he directed the youth programme for St Ann’s Episcopal Church in the South Bronx; co-founded and directed Sanctuary, a crisis counseling and drug-education program in Boston; and participated in Operation Crossroads Africa in the Central African Republic.

As a priest, he directed the Diocese of New York's Peace and Disarmament Programme in the 1980s, and has served on the boards of Bauen Art Camp and the Episcopal Church and Visual Arts. Faulkner currently serves as vicar of Christ Church in Sparkill, New York.

As a sculptor, Faulkner has done installations throughout the United States. His Stations of the Cross project was most recently installed at the Church of Our Saviour, San Gabriel, California.

His work has been reviewed in major art periodicals, newspapers and on radio. Faulkner lives in New York City with his wife, the Rev Brenda Husson, rector of St. James Church, and their young son.

More information about the artist and his work may be found here: http://www.utsnyc.edu/NETCOMMUNITY/Page.aspx?pid=969

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