Take action with Practical Action

By staff writers
10 Feb 2009

Development charity Practical Action has launched a campaign to remind UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown of his commitment to the Millennium Development Goal of eradicating poverty.

The vital work they carry out is all in vain, they say, unless government gets serious about tackling climate change, the knock on effect of which effectively cancels out the benefit of current efforts. Poor countries are already feeling the effects of climate change, and will inevitably be hit hardest in the long run. The Government must make the link again between the plight of the world's poor and the degradation of the climate, campaigners say.

Members of the public can visit the Practical Action website where they can send Gordon Brown an e-mail reminding him of his 'moral and legal obligation' to intervene on behalf of the poorest people in the world – those who have contributed least to global emissions.

Among their requests is a commitment to the reduction of carbon emissions sufficient to maintain a 2ºC rise in global temperature.

As a charity that focuses on combating poverty with the help of simple yet revolutionary technologies, Practical Action have also stated the need for funding to enable the world's poorest countries to adapt to the changing climate.

In the 'Make the Link' report, Practical Action state that the current failure of governments to take robust and decisive action on climate change has placed signatory countries on a sure path to failure with regard to meeting the Millennium Development Goals.

According to a recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), greenhouse gas emissions must be cut by over 80% over the next four decades to give us any chance of halting the global temperature rise at 2ºC.

Read the full report here

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