Brown should ‘reflect’ with Pope on his part in economic crisis

Brown should ‘reflect’ with Pope on his part in economic crisis

By staff writers
18 Feb 2009

Catholic aid agency CAFOD says Prime Minister Gordon Brown should use his audience with Pope Benedict XVI to reflect on his part in the global economic crisis.

Director of CAFOD Chris Bain said: "Today, because of the global recession, millions more people are being driven deeper into poverty. In the developing world, it is for many a matter of life and death.

"As part of the G20, Gordon Brown must right the wrongs of institutionalised greed and create a new financial model which acts for the common good. At the G20 negotiating table, he has the opportunity to be the voice for those excluded from the talks – developing and emerging economies – and it is his moral responsibility to secure their financial futures as well as our own.

"The meeting with the Pope is important ahead of the G20, because it sends the message that economics and business should serve people. CAFOD hopes that Gordon Brown will find the spiritual courage to put people first."

Gordon Brown will have an audience with the Pope in the Vatican on Thursday Feb 19, during which they will be discussing ‘development issues’.

The meeting will be Brown's first with the Pope since he became prime minister.

CAFOD is part of the huge 'Put People First' coalition, which is made up of more than 60 unions, development agencies, domestic poverty, faith and environmental groups. The alliance will tell world leaders attending the G20 summit - happening just five days afterwards on 2 April - that only just, fair and sustainable policies can lead the world out of recession.

On 28 March, the coalition is organising a mass demonstration, entitled ‘March for Jobs, Justice and Climate'. It will start at the Victoria Embankment and culminate in a rally in Hyde Park. It will demand decent jobs and public services for all, an end to global poverty and inequality, and a green economy.

Keywords: cafod | put people first
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