Dead bird challenges fat cats

Dead bird challenges fat cats

By staff writers
31 Mar 2009

Protestors carrying a huge dead canary and signs saying ‘Canary Wharf RIP’ will demonstrate tomorrow against the government’s attempts to revive the dead policies of the free market system on the eve of the G20 summit of the world’s leading economies.

Campaigners from the charity War on Want will join protestors outside the Bank of England as demonstrators step up their fight against efforts by world leaders to preserve the system that has caused the economic meltdown.

Ruth Tanner, campaigns and policy director at War on Want, said: “Scores of thousands of marchers, including our protestors, took part in the Put People First demonstration last weekend. Now we will take the struggle for a fairer and safer world to the heart of the City which helped cause the crisis.

"The giant dead canary will send a clear signal that the greed at Canary Wharf and other financial centres should make way for a new economic order which favours people’s needs over fat cats’ profits.”

War on Want warns that the G20 summit will continue to defend the failed system of open markets and light-touch regulation and says that financial institutions cannot be trusted to deliver outcomes in the public interest.

The charity says that the leaked draft G20 communiqué supports Brown's call for a swift conclusion of the Doha round of trade talks. This will cost millions of people their jobs and condemn hundreds of millions more to poverty.

War on Want cites growing unemployment as the International Labour Organisation forecasts over 50 million more people worldwide could lose their jobs by the end of this year [,]and 200 million workers fall into extreme poverty. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development says that by next year, jobless numbers in rich nations could rise by eight million to 42 million.

War on Want is pressing Britain to end its support for the World Trade Organisation and the International Monetary Fund, which it says leaves poor countries without a voice and seeks to win greater power by exploiting the current turmoil.

Keywords: g20
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