Simon Barrow's blog

Should politicians 'do God'?

Should politicians 'do God'?

Many believers want politicians to talk more about God and faith. Many secularists wish they would stop doing so. But are both missing the point?

Supporting Nicaragua

Supporting Nicaragua

Two new trustees needed for the Board of the charity Nicaragua
Solidarity Campaign. Can you help?

Believable finance

Believable finance

Ekklesia's briefing on faith and economy has been updated again to include the latest material appearing on the site about the global credit crunch.

The church and alternative economics

When Ekklesia pointed out that the Church of England appears to be involved in the dodgy market dealing it rhetorically condemns, the main point of our argument was that the churches have a golden opportunity to invest in something much more exciting.

Rowan Williams makes his Marx

Rowan Williams makes his Marx

While disastrous things have been done in his name, Karl Marx's status as a moral prophet against greed was reinforced from an unexpected source this week - the Archbishop of Canterbury.

Religion and secularism in southeast Asia

Religion and secularism in southeast Asia

This month, the Marty Center's Religion and Culture Web Forum (University of Chicago) features research on "Secularism, Religious Renaissance, and Social Conflict in Asia" by Richard Madsen.

A heated faith schools debate

A heated faith schools debate

Predictably, those who oppose the anti-discrimination stance of Accord are calling it an anti-faith schools coalition. It isn't.

A big small big world

A big small big world

The rich and powerful now have their own social networking site. It's called Eye of a Needle? Nope, it's called ASW. And you're not invited.

Are they listening?

Are they listening?

This week the Anglican bishops gathered at the Lambeth Conference will have to confront their divisions and future options.

The perils of nuclear diplomacy

The perils of nuclear diplomacy

The prospect of war over Iran's nuclear plans seemed to recede in mid-July 2008 after a marked change in United States attitudes to the country. But what is really going on?