Category - social justice

  • 23 Dec 2013

    "My faith in the people governing us is, on the whole, infinitesimal; my faith in The People governed is, on the whole, illimitable." -- Charles Dickens.

    As we approach Christmas, the memory of MPs in the foodbank debate laughing at the notion of poor people fighting over cheap food could have been enough to dampen anyone’s Christmas spirit. But what Charles Dickens asserted over a century ago is still true: many of the people those MPs represent are more generous, more noble, and more selfless than the MPs could ever imagine.

  • 8 Dec 2013

    On Sunday 8 December 2013 I am happy to be joining some 700 people in Glasgow for a celebratory Common Weal launch event, hosted by the pioneering Jimmy Reid Foundation.

  • 4 Dec 2013

    An event in London promoting women in the mining sector is being challenged by women resisting the ecological and social devastation from mining projects.

  • 27 Nov 2013

    The current economic system is “unjust at the root”, Pope Francis declared. In a major new document, he urged Roman Catholics to work with fellow Christians and others towards a more humane and peaceful world.

  • 7 Nov 2013

    Following reflections from around the world on Christian unity, Asia and mission, the WCC assembly plenary on 6 November highlighted struggles for justice.

  • 19 Jul 2013

    The UN has marked Nelson Mandela International Day, celebrating his 95th birthday and his dedication to public service, social justice and reconciliation.

  • 29 May 2013

    How goes the referendum on Scottish independence? This is the question my friends from down south ask almost every time I speak to them. The answer is that it feels to be in a strange kind of limbo.

  • 17 Feb 2013

    The School of Social Sciences at the University of Manchester is offering a free workshop on 1 March 2013 looking at 'Equality and sufficiency in distributive justice'.

  • 23 Jan 2013

    This week (20 January 2013) the thinktank Demos (“ideas and action to promote the common good”) has published its report Faithful Providers, which argues that faith-based organisations should be used more as public service providers. Simon Barrow offers an initial response, highlighting some of the problematic assumptions and stances within the report, setting out the background to successive government's interest in co-opting faith providers, and pointing towards a more radical Christian stance which roots service in a tradition of modelling and advocating a different social order based on justice and equality.

  • 12 Jan 2013