Category - non-religious

  • 1 Dec 2014

    Karen Armstrong, whose new book Fields of Blood: Religion and the History of Violence invites far more subtle understanding of the relationship between faith and fratricide globally, has written a characteristically thoughtful piece on IS/ISIS for The New Statesman magazine: 'Wahhabism to ISIS: how Saudi Arabia exported the main source of global terrorism'.

  • 26 Aug 2013

    Just Festival and its predecessor, the Festival of Spirituality and Peace, has been concerned over the years to strike up a genuine personal, artistic, spiritual and cultural conversation among the different religions and beliefs that make up our country.

  • 5 Aug 2013

    Twenty years ago, many public commentators believed that religion was dead, or at least 'on the way out'. How wrong that proved. Simon Barrow looks at how the conversation about faith is deepening and broadening in the face of growing religious and non-religious diversity.

  • 12 Dec 2012

    A new report highlights the sometimes extreme limitations on freedom of thought for the non-religious in over 60 countries across the world.

  • 11 Dec 2012

    The British Humanist Association (BHA) has released an infographic to show the rise in the number of people who ticked ‘No Religion’ in the 2011 Census, and the decline in the number of people who tic

  • 11 Dec 2012
  • 11 Dec 2012

    England and Wales are becoming ever more mixed in belief, identity and culture, the 2011 census data released today (11 December 2012) reveals.

  • 4 Dec 2012

    The Scout Association and Girlguiding UK have announced that they are to consult on extending membership to non-religious people, atheists and agnostics.

  • 21 Apr 2012

    Belief in God is slowly declining in most countries around the world, but persists or grows most in developing countries and Catholic societies.

  • 10 Apr 2012

    When governments are displaced they can persist within contemporary states as ‘religions’ that maintain their patriarchal origins and character, says Professor Naomi Goldenberg. Since women’s challenges to male domination have only met with some success in recent times within fairly contemporary forms of statecraft, if earlier states known as ‘religions’ are allowed too much authority over domains such as ‘the family’ or ‘the home,’ women will be the losers, she argues.