Category - Kyrgyzstan

  • December 16, 2010

    The Kyrgyzstani authorities are failing to provide justice for thousands of victims of human rights abuses, according to a new report by Amnesty International.

  • November 30, 2010

    The Duke of York has been urged to resign from his position as a UK “trade ambassador” after he appeared to defend corruption in the arms industry.

  • September 9, 2010

    Despite deep fissures in Kyrgyz society in the aftermath of the upheavals, external intervention would be counterproductive, advises John Heathershaw. Instead, foreign governments should concentrate their efforts on reducing the stakes of the conflict.

  • June 22, 2010

    The tragic outbreak of 'ethnic' violence in southern Kyrgyzstan has been explained in much of the international press in clichés and over-generalisations, writes John Heathershaw. Yet such violence is unprecedented in Kyrgyzstan’s history as an independent nation. Now some exceptional individuals and groups are seeking to bridge the divide between communities.

  • June 22, 2010

    ACT Alliance, a global network of church-based development organisations, has begun the ‘impartial’ distribution of food to areas in Kyrgyzstan worst hit by recent attacks on Uzbek communities.

  • June 18, 2010

    Amnesty International is calling for an impartial international investigation into the violent events of the past week in southern Kyrgyzstan which left hundreds of people dead.

  • June 17, 2010

    The worst conflict in Kyrgyzstan since a revolution in April may spread beyond the area around the southern city of Osh, the international ACT Alliance development agency has warned.

  • April 14, 2010

    Kyrgyzstan’s government has fallen, its provisional rulers are untested, and there is as yet no sign of a lasting political settlement, writes John Heathershaw. Yet that does not mean it will automatically follow the example of neighbour Tajikistan and descend into civil war. Peace is difficult but possible.

  • October 6, 2007

    A coalition of church-based aid and development agencies is backing a creative range of self-help initiatives in the former Soviet Central Asian republics, such as Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan, which are often overlooked in the worldwide media.