Category - secularism

  • 7 Apr 2011

    It is not the non-theistic philosophy that is dismaying in Grayling’s new 'secular bible', says Maggi dawn. It’s the sheer failure of imagination of someone who will dismiss the real Bible as mumbo jumbo, while putting their own uninspiring prose out there as an alternative.

  • 18 Mar 2011

    The average Church of Norway member went to church once a year in 2010, Statistics Norway reported in the annual statistical report it sends to the church.

  • 18 Mar 2011

    Sweden, by some standards one of the world’s most secular countries, has passed a new education law stipulating that public schools must teach their subjects in a “non-confessional” and “objective” manner. Joseph Ballan explores the complex boundaries and definitions of secularity and religiosity in the public arena.

  • 10 Mar 2011

    Discussion is needed on the prospects of secular polity in the Middle East, historian Professor Simon Schama has said in a public lecture at Cambridge University.

  • 7 Mar 2011

    Religion changes and mutates. Some of these religious mutations can be positively harmful in a changing Middle East. But other religious innovations can help religion accommodate itself to modernity, says Ahmad Sadri. It doesn’t matter whether a society has or does not have religion per se. What is important is what kind of religion or irreligion pervades in that society.

  • 11 Jan 2011

    If we are fixated upon privilege or special treatment, we will miss the Gospel message that transformational relationships are at the heart of the faith of Jesus, says Jill Segger

  • 9 Nov 2010

    The University of Notre Dame in the USA is inaugurating a major cross-cultural research project on 'contending modernities', religious and secular.

  • 23 Oct 2010

    A Turkish government adviser has said that Christians and Muslims should be allowed to worship again in Istanbul's Hagia Sophia basilica.

  • 20 Oct 2010

    The problem for Christians today is not primarily 'aggressive secularism', but the confusion of Christianity with power, says Simon Barrow. That and the the distortion of public debate about religiosity and secularity into a false dichotomy between dominating belief or privatised belief. A better way is needed - based on living by example, not the lust for control.

  • 17 Oct 2010

    Many progressive Christians found themselves experiencing profoundly mixed feelings both about Pope Benedict’s visit and about the protests against it, says Simon Barrow. This is perhaps because neither imperial religion nor rejectionist forms of secularism are adequate to the task of remaking public life and public faith.