Category - Religion

  • 3 Sep 2013

    Religion | Newswriters in the USA is inviting journalists in the United States to apply to its Lilly Scholarships in Religion Program. The scholarships give full-time journalists up to $5,000 to take any college religion courses at any accredited institution at any time.

  • 16 Aug 2013

    Fifteen years ago, 'faith' was seen as a virtually spent subject in the public realm, certainly in the view of its many 'cultured despisers'.

  • 12 Aug 2013

    That's an interesting and tantalisingly ambiguous question. Are we talking about the appearance of beliefs in an increasingly multi-platform world, the question of belief or otherwise in media values and performance, or some combination of the two?

  • 12 Aug 2013

    Religion and the News is the title of a book published at the end of last year (2012), co-edited by Professor Jolyon Mitchell, who is taking part in tonight's 'Faith and the Media' conversation at St John's Church, Edinburgh, 6-7.30pm, as part of Just Festival.

  • 7 Aug 2013

    Religion is a 'hot topic' one way or another. Some love it, some loathe it, many go meh... but you can't ignore the diverse belief mix that now makes up a modern plural society.

  • 5 Aug 2013

    What would a conversation about religion among those who have abandoned it, or who are on the very edge of it, sound and feel like?

  • 5 Aug 2013

    Twenty years ago, many public commentators believed that religion was dead, or at least 'on the way out'. How wrong that proved. Simon Barrow looks at how the conversation about faith is deepening and broadening in the face of growing religious and non-religious diversity.

  • 5 Aug 2013

    The lines in the John Lennon song are famous by now: "Imagine there's no religion... it's easy if you try..." But is it, and what would it mean?

  • 31 Jul 2013

    The Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion and Public Life has been renamed, and its web site and resources have been given a makeover.

  • 9 Jun 2013

    Religious faith and practice can make the most committed and powerful contributions to reconciliation and to economic justice. It can also use texts and traditions to avoid responsibility and to commit selfish or harmful actions, says Dr Olav Fykse Tveit, General Secretary of the World Council of Churches. Speaking to the UN, he offers an inspiring yet honest vision of the way churches and other religious communities can make a vital contribution to building justice and peace for the whole of humanity, while being held necessarily accountable before God and the world they are intended to serve.