Category - Power

  • 2 Nov 2013

    Former WCC General Secretary, Konrad Raiser, has discussed his new book Religion, Power, Politics at its tenth Assembly

  • 27 Oct 2013

    Propaganda could be described as persuasion without morals. It has been a tool of power for centuries and in our own time, its use in inculcating a state of belief which is not in proportion to evidence, is most clearly seen in politicians' choice and use of slogans.

  • 14 Oct 2013

    2013 marks the 1700th anniversary of the Edict of Milan, when emperor Constantine ended the persecution of Christianity, to which he had converted. In early October, World Council of Churches General Secretary Dr Olav Fykse Tveit praised Constantine’s legacy in glowing terms. Yet in reality it has been a mixture of harm and good.

  • 23 Mar 2013

    As politicians fret about the Leveson inquiry and struggle to square the circle of defending a media free from state interference that some argue needs to be better protected by the state from unethical corporate politicking and domination, there is great value in us returning to examine Jesus’ engagement with the a major medium of communication in his day: the Temple. Keith Hebden argues that across the chasm of the centuries, lessons in confronting power and 'domination systems' are there to be learned if we pay proper attention.

  • 24 Sep 2012

    It may appear graceless to ask the question, but how likely is it that Andrew Mitchell would have managed even the evasive partial apology heard today if he had thought he could get away with his arrogant loutishness towards officers of the Diplomatic Protection Group and retain his job?

  • 13 Aug 2012

    Something unlooked for has happened over the last two weeks. Many of us have been turned from Olympic scepticism towards – if not an entirely uncritical enthusiasm – a frame of mind which acknowledges it has caught a glimpse of the kind of society which we could be, and has taken inspiration from it.

  • 1 Feb 2011

    Power, its exercise and abuse has filled our screens and newspapers during the last week. The word takes our minds in a particular direction – towards the power that can shut down the internet, buzz protesters with fighter jets, marketise the NHS, sell off our forests, kettle and pepper-spray dissent.

  • 4 Jun 2009
  • 12 Oct 2008

    Much contemporary human rights discourse is individualistic. But, Savi Hensman points out, human beings are also shaped by economic, social, cultural and religious forces which work for justice - or against it.

  • 13 Nov 2007

    Modern democratic politics is in danger of turning into a beauty contest and an electoral pantomime, says Simon Barrow. It needs reconnecting with people in civil society, changing institutions and the grassroots.