• November 8, 2013

    The Quaker Lesbian and Gay Fellowship has been named Community Group of the Year by Stonewall supporters for their long-standing commitment to equality.

  • September 5, 2013

    What are the prospects for equality in a Scotland that either strikes out towards independence or remains within the United Kingdom?

  • July 30, 2013

    Support for monarchy relies more on emotion than it does on reason. It is therefore only sensible to admit that this is not the most fruitful time to be a Republican.

  • June 21, 2013

    Exodus International, which for decades claimed to be able to change people’s sexual orientation, has apologised and is closing.

  • April 16, 2013

    The Methodist Council agreed further work on poverty, equality and inclusivity when it met at Uplands House in High Wycombe on 13 - 15 April.

  • March 24, 2013

    Politicians tend to become grandiose when they are trying to sell us an idea. The rhetorical use of the concept of 'nation' to corral us together under a conveniently high-sounding label has, in recent months, tried to sign us up to being both 'one nation' and an 'aspiration nation.'

  • March 8, 2013

    High Pay Centre research shows that even modest wealth redistribution could make a big difference to the standard of living of low-earners.

  • February 17, 2013

    The School of Social Sciences at the University of Manchester is offering a free workshop on 1 March 2013 looking at 'Equality and sufficiency in distributive justice'.

  • February 14, 2013

    It is a truly terrible statistic: one in three women will experience violence at the hands of men at some time in their lives. This represents around one billion individuals and today – when so many are celebrating the gentler aspect of relationships between men and women – the One Billion Rising movement attempts to bring people together across 200 countries to call for change. (http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/node/17999)

  • January 23, 2013

    This week (20 January 2013) the thinktank Demos (“ideas and action to promote the common good”) has published its report Faithful Providers, which argues that faith-based organisations should be used more as public service providers. Simon Barrow offers an initial response, highlighting some of the problematic assumptions and stances within the report, setting out the background to successive government's interest in co-opting faith providers, and pointing towards a more radical Christian stance which roots service in a tradition of modelling and advocating a different social order based on justice and equality.