social justice

  • 12 Jan 2013
  • 3 Jan 2013

    Bernadette Meaden reviews the book that many radical Christians have been waiting for. It shows, she says, how spirituality can be a unifying, liberating force, and how looking at the world from a Jesus perspective can be joyful and life-enhancing.

  • 19 Dec 2012

    At the end of a recent speech to the Centre for Social Justice, John Cruddas MP made a rightful appeal for extended local democracy, says political theologian Graeme Smith. But he got there by caricaturing John Stuart Mill, mystifying Aristotle and elevating a confused communitarianism over the proper role of a democratic state in embedding social justice. This warmed-over Blue Labourism needs some serious questioning in terms of its historical understanding and political roots, he suggests.

  • 18 Dec 2012

    UK-based global development agency Christian Aid has launched a new movement to encourage young people to come together to tackle injustice.

  • 13 Dec 2012

    Ruth Lister, who is a peer, emeritus professor of social policy at Loughborough University and chair of the Compass management committee, has written a fine, short piece for the Guardian on benefits and uprating.

  • 16 Nov 2012

    Father Michael Rodrigo’s life and witness in Sri Lanka reflect the importance of perseverance, hope and faith in a better future, says Savi Hensman. This remarkable man still has something to say today, when all too many people live precariously in a divided and often violent world.

  • 14 Aug 2012

    Among the most stimulating series of events at this year's Festival of Spirituality and Peace in Edinburgh will be the provocative 'Scottish Six' talks by broadcaster Lesley Riddoch and land reformer Andy Wightman.

  • 7 Jun 2012

    Occupy Faith, supported by Occupy London, faith groups and the Archbishop of Wales, is undertaking a Pilgrimage for Justice, starting today.

  • 24 Apr 2012

    When we talk about issues of economic justice, it’s nearly always a broad discussion of unjust structures and systems rather than individuals, and on the whole that’s probably the way it should be. But does that in effect mean that the super-rich, the one per cent, are allowed to be comfortably anonymous and unaccountable? And should they be allowed to remain so?

  • 28 Mar 2012

    World Council of Churches' mission delegates have spent half a day with a community living at a garbage dumpsite on the outskirts of Manila, Philippines.