churches

  • 16 Sep 2008

    Christian leaders and organizations worldwide have welcomed the announcement of an agreement to form a unity government in Zimbabwe, while also saying that many challenges lie ahead for the southern African nation.

  • 9 Sep 2008

    The southwest of England has seen an increased spate of thefts of church bells and equipment, irrigation pipes from schools and other scrap metal from business and domestic property in recent weeks.

  • 26 Aug 2008

    Christian leaders in Zimbabwe have called on parties to continuing power-sharing talks to shun partisan interests and urgently break the impasse that is holding back the conclusion of negotiations aimed at resolving the country's political and economic crisis.

  • 2 Jul 2008

    While some African national leaders continued to court Robert Mugabe at an African Union meeting in Egypt, despite their own observers saying that the presidential election was unacceptable, South African churches have spoken candidly.

  • 17 Jun 2008
  • 14 Jun 2008

    Church leaders in Canada want action to follow a public apology by Prime Minister Stephen Harper to victims of a situation where aboriginal children were placed in residential schools run by churches in a policy of enforced assimilation.

  • 18 May 2008

    Christian communities in mainland China and Hong Kong, both Protestant and Catholic, have been offering practical support and prayers to victims in Sichuan, who have suffered a devastating earthquake, China's worst in 30 years,

  • 14 May 2008

    Chinese churches and Christian agencies, as well as the government and army, have begun responding to the recent earthquake. The quake, measuring 7.9 on the Richter scale, has devastated a region west of the provincial capital Chengdu.

  • 14 May 2008

    The National Council of Churches in India has joined the battle to turn green by calling for Christians to mobilise in the world's second most populous nation, and to join in the fight against global warming.

  • 6 May 2008

    An Anglican deacon who steps down during 2008 after three decades leading the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement, believes that if the Anglican communion separates over homosexuality the onus will fall upon "those who walked away".