church of england

  • 12 Dec 2012

    The government's proposals for same-sex marriage have revealed them to be clueless about religion, contemptuous of civil rights and bizarrely ignorant about the history, culture and politics of Wales. There is a serious possibility of these proposals failing to pass through Parliament. We must step up the campaign for civil rights, not assume they have been won.

  • 12 Dec 2012
  • 12 Dec 2012

    The Archbishop of Wales has condemned the UK Government’s plan explicitly to ban the Church in Wales from performing same-sex marriages.

  • 11 Dec 2012

    The government’s commitment to allow most religious organisations to conduct same-sex marriages - but not the Church of England and the Church in Wales - is a disappointing fudge that perpetuates inequality.

  • 9 Dec 2012

    The chair of the Church Urban Fund has criticised punitive government welfare cuts and the emaciation of the social contract behind the welfare state.

  • 8 Dec 2012

    After the Prime Minister’s positive commitment to equal marriage and religious freedom, the official Church of England response was disappointingly negative.

  • 3 Dec 2012

    Dr Harry Hagopian suggests that a recent letter to the UK Foreign Secretary from two senior bishops opens up some fruitful lines of investigation in understanding, and seeking solutions to, a long-standing grievance in the Middle East.

  • 3 Dec 2012

    Two senior bishops, an Anglican and a Catholic, have written a public letter to Foreign Secretary William Hague urging fresh thinking about Israel-Palestine.

  • 27 Nov 2012

    Setting the Church of England free would be in its own interests, says Simon Barrow, as the disestablishment debate rears its head again following the General Synod debacle over women bishops. The Christian religion’s claim to truth and authority resides neither in state nor market, but in systems of belief and community which it should be capable of developing through bodies that are part of civic society.

  • 27 Nov 2012

    The Church of England’s attempts to placate a small minority strongly opposed to women’s ordination have plunged it into crisis, without satisfying these opponents, says Savi Hensman. What is the way forward now? Deep theological and practical questions need to be addressed, and the answers explained in ways that those who are not professional theologians can understand.