church of england

  • 1 Dec 2013

    Churches with different views in heated debates about sexuality actually share common ground and can move forward despite their differences, says a new paper from the Christian think-tank Ekklesia.

  • 1 Dec 2013

    Ekklesia associate Savitri Hensman will be appearing on the BBC Radio 4 Sunday programme, and then on local station Radio Berkshire, on the morning of Sunday 1 December – talking about the Pilling report on sexuality in the Church of England, and hopefully getting the chance to mention her own important Ekklesia research paper, 'Church views on sexuality: recovering the middle ground'.

  • 30 Nov 2013

    Clergy should be free to hold services for same-sex couples, a Church of England working party has urged, while not embracing full inclusion at present.

  • 21 Nov 2013

    The Church of England’s decision to move a step closer towards allowing women to be bishops is a welcome move. By 378 votes to eight, General Synod backed a package of proposals to take forward legislation which may be approved in 2014.

  • 20 Nov 2013

    The General Synod of the Church of England, its governing body, has approved a package of measures as the next steps to enable women to become bishops.

  • 19 Nov 2013
  • 19 Nov 2013

    In addition to challenging the misuse of statistics in recent claims about Church of England Schools, the The Fair Admissions Campaign, of which Ekklesia is part, has recently highlighted a number of Church schools that are highly selective in their admissions.

  • 15 Nov 2013
  • 15 Nov 2013

    The Archbishop of Canterbury’s statement that Church of England schools can move away from religious selection "opens the door" to change, say reformers.

  • 28 Oct 2013

    This is a time to be both politically and practically subversive in the face of a growing political consensus that is hurting the most vulnerable, says Jonathan Bartley. All of the main parties in the UK, including Labour, support the cut in housing benefit. Labour has said that it would not reverse it - or, indeed, most of the other welfare reforms - should it gain power at the next election. In the face of such a negative consensus, new social housing could become a central weapon in the Churches' fight to protect the poorest.