public services

  • 20 Oct 2014

    In a brilliant piece in the Guardian, Ha-Joon Chang comprehensively demolishes the economic ‘recovery’ claimed by the coalition government, dismissing as an ‘economic fairytale’ its claims of success.

  • 11 Jul 2014

    Low share prices when the UK government privatised Royal Mail cost the taxpayer around £1 billion, a parliamentary committee has reported. Meanwhile the National Health Service and social services are in financial crisis.

  • 23 Mar 2014

    I am looking forward to delivering my forthcoming lecture in the Swansea University Public Lectures in Theology series (24 March 2014, details below), and I am very appreciative to the University for giving me this opportunity.

  • 9 Dec 2013

    Millions of people are being left behind, and the charities that help them are being shut out from the faltering Big Society project, says a new report

  • 12 Nov 2013

    The UK government’s cuts to spending on public services are for ideological reasons, not just because of the deficit. In a speech at the lord mayor’s banquet in the Guildhall, Prime Minister David Cameron announced his intention to build “a leaner, more efficient state. We need to do more with less. Not just now, but permanently.”

  • 21 Aug 2013

    Plans to outsource public service provision to independent employee-led mutuals should not ignore the views of workers, says the TUC and Co-operatives UK

  • 15 Jul 2013

    The Just Peace Pilgrims arrive in London this week, bringing the message that the £100bn cost of Trident would be better spent on funding essential human needs.

  • 24 Jun 2013

    UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has encouraged countries to focus on the importance of good governance and efficient public administration.

  • 12 Apr 2013

    Campaigners from 39 UK organisations will call for a shift in government spending on 15 April, the Global Day of Action on Military Spending (GDAMS)

  • 23 Jan 2013

    This week (20 January 2013) the thinktank Demos (“ideas and action to promote the common good”) has published its report Faithful Providers, which argues that faith-based organisations should be used more as public service providers. Simon Barrow offers an initial response, highlighting some of the problematic assumptions and stances within the report, setting out the background to successive government's interest in co-opting faith providers, and pointing towards a more radical Christian stance which roots service in a tradition of modelling and advocating a different social order based on justice and equality.