terror

  • August 1, 2011

    In the ten days since the terror attacks in Norway, pastors and church workers have played a major role in caring for survivors and the victims' families.

  • July 31, 2011

    A Norwegian bishop addressing the recent bombing and shooting attacks in Norway says love and solidarity is the best response to the killing frenzy.

  • July 30, 2011

    In a letter to the Christian Council of Norway, the World Council of Churches (WCC) has expressed support over the terrible killings last week.

  • July 24, 2011

    On the day that Anders Brehing Breivik, driven by hatred of Islam and of his country's political establishment, unleashed death and terror on an unimaginable scale in Oslo and Utoya, I lay on a treatment table in the Accident and Emergency department of my local hospital. The doctor attending to my pain and shock was a gentle young Muslim called Ali.

  • July 23, 2011

    At least 92 people were reported dead in Norway, after a bomb blast and shooting spree on 22 July. There has been an outpouring of sympathy across the world for the victims, many of them young, and their families, and horror at this atrocity.

  • July 23, 2011

    Last week few people had heard the name of Anders Behring Breivik. Today he is trending on twitter for all the wrong reasons, along with 'Freemasonry' and 'Christianity'.

  • July 23, 2011

    A right-wing Christian extremist, 32-year-old Anders Behring Breivik, has been charged with bomb and gun terror attacks in Norway yesterday.

  • July 23, 2011

    Norway has experienced “an unprecedented, horrible level of violence against innocent people,” says the Norwegian head of a world churches' body.

  • May 3, 2011

    In the months leading up to the killing of Osama bin Laden, a survey of Muslim publics around the world found little support for the al-Qaida leader.

  • May 2, 2011

    Osama Bin Laden may be dead, but if Americans and Europeans now think that they can begin to relax over the prospect of ‘international terror’, they are very mistaken, says Michael Marten. US policy in particular is catastrophically misaligned in the Middle East, Africa and South East Asia. The 'clash of civilisations' thesis is also gravely misleading, and religion (not least Islam) is not implicated in all this in the way simplistic analyses presume.