welfare

  • February 1, 2012
  • February 1, 2012

    The House of Commons debates the Welfare Reform Bill for the last time today, following a record seventh defeat for the government in the House of Lords last night.

  • January 31, 2012

    The excellent Joint Public Issues Team shared jointly by the Methodist Church, the United Reformed Church and the Baptist Union of Great Britain has produced a very good guide to why a generic benefit cap is a bad idea for people living at the sharp end of austerity.

  • January 31, 2012

    The Children's Society has issued a statement following the government's latest Lords defeat, on cuts effecting disabled children, in the Welfare Reform Bill.

  • January 31, 2012

    Lobbying of MPs is set to intensify in the next 18 hours, after the government suffered a seventh humiliating defeat on its controversial Welfare Reform Bill.

  • January 31, 2012

    The Church of Scotland has joined leading charities, faith groups and trade unions in urging Scottish MPs to uphold the Lords amendments to the Welfare Reform Bill.

  • January 31, 2012

    The Methodist Church, the Baptist Union of Great Britain, the United Reformed Church and the Quakers in Britain have called for Parliament to reject a benefit cap.

  • January 31, 2012

    Crossbenchers and others in the House of Lords will seek one more time to amend the Welfare Reform Bill to prevent a reduction in the money paid to disabled children.

  • January 30, 2012

    Successive UK governments, and their media allies, have been vigorous in smearing benefit claimants. To achieve this, politicians and their propagandists have played on popular stereotypes, stoking up prejudice against ‘scroungers’ while lavishly rewarding members of their own class at taxpayers’ expense. Savi Hensman looks at the reality behind the rhetoric, especially in relation to assessment.

  • January 30, 2012

    Dear Iain

    You once described yourself as “the quiet man”. It didn't quite work for you at the time, which is a pity, because quietness implies a capacity for reflection, listening and, in the words of our Quaker 'Advices and Queries', for finding space to “consider it possible you may be mistaken”. These are not qualities which are much in evidence among our noisier politicians.