christmas

  • December 30, 2014

    The World Council of Churches has welcomed seasonal contributions from congregations and individuals, as well as member churches and ecumenical partners.

  • December 26, 2014

    Due not least to the ubiquity of 'Downton Abbey' on television this Christmas (no, I don't, since you ask) many more people will be aware – if they weren't already – of the background to Boxing Day (26 December).

  • December 26, 2014

    Has the usual seasonal avalanche of "they're trying to ban Christmas!" stories abated somewhat, at least in Britain? Simon Barrow looks at the evidence and asks what it says to us about the church and Christianity in an emerging post-Chrstendom era.

  • December 25, 2014

    Thanks to Ekklesia's Australian associate, Doug Hynd, for pointing us in the direction of an intriguing piece about civil disobedience at the heart of the nativity story - and from an unexpected source.

  • December 25, 2014

    In his traditional Christmas Day address, Pope Francis denounced religiously motivated violence and persecution, making a strong call for peace.

  • December 25, 2014

    The Archbishop of Canterbury's Christmas sermon has been made available online, as he was unable to deliver it in person due to illness.

  • December 25, 2014

    What is that we are faced with when we contemplate the birth of Jesus in the east?

  • December 23, 2014

    Ferguson is in turmoil. So is New York. And so is Union Theological Seminary in the city of New York, a long-standing institution of theological education located on the upper west side of Manhattan – or in West Harlem – since 1836. Annegreth Schilling, a German theologian currently at Union, looks at the social and political location and witness of theology in a troubled and unjust world.

  • December 23, 2014

    The Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland says he regrets once castigating those who only come to church at Christmas.

  • December 23, 2014

    At Christmas 1914, four months into World War One, British and German soldiers on the Western front laid down their weapons. They exchanged small gifts, sang carols, buried their dead, and some even kicked a football around.