alternative economics

  • 4 Oct 2011

    The economic crisis is also an ethical crisis and faith groups need to say something about it, says an advocate of economic ethics.

  • 22 Sep 2011

    Quakers in Britain says that people and society are being geared to supporting economic systems, rather than the other way round.

  • 22 Aug 2011

    Many economic commentators, and those working in banking and finance, thought that the worst of the global economic recession had gone away. They were wrong. It looks to be back with a vengeance.

  • 15 Aug 2011

    In most religious traditions there is a commitment to giving money to the poor, and more radically to various kinds of economic sharing within communities.

  • 19 Jun 2011

    The Green Party has called for an end to "arbitrary, ego-driven economic policy-making". It wants an "open, rational debate" about sustainability.

  • 2 May 2011

    A campaign to lobby FTSE 100 companies to adopt the Living Wage has been backed by the Methodist Church and its Central Finance Board.

  • 7 Apr 2011

    Jubilee Debt Campaign heralds a success, as the European Parliament says export credits should be guided by environment and development safeguards.

  • 4 Apr 2011

    On 6 April 2011 the International Monetary Fund is meeting in Washington DC to discuss for the first time how to spend a $3 billion windfall from selling gold and lending more money since the financial crisis.

  • 27 Mar 2011

    This short film by Oonagh Cousins highlights, in accessible terms, what 'the alternative' to the current recessionary government trajectory looks like - and introduces some of the key players - including political economist Ann Pettifor (who is involved in the 'Green New Deal' group, and writes for Ekklesia among others), UK Uncut, the Robin Hood Tax Campaign initiative, False Economy, and others.

  • 27 Mar 2011

    Listening to the the suave propaganda pouring from the lips of Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander, and other government apologists over the last 24 hours, I am struck by the persistence of the 'deficit denial' theme - and the fact that it seems to have won over a significant portion of the public. This does not make what is being said any more factually sound, ethically substantial or intellectually rigorous, of course.