democracy

  • 26 Jul 2009

    Real Change: The Open Politics Network is shortly to be involved in a series of small ‘hearings’ (focus-group like meetings) across the UK to find out what concerned citizens in Britain think about the renewal of politics and the democratic process.

  • 8 Jul 2009

    “Reform so as to preserve” is still the mantra of the political elite in Britain. But civil society organisations, faith groups, politicians and ordinary people can help change the agenda, says Simon Barrow.

  • 11 Jun 2009

    A statement about electoral reforms made by Gordon Brown yesterday, which could include the end to the first-past-the post voting system in general elections, has been given a cautious welcome by democracy campaigners who also expressed concern.

  • 10 Jun 2009

    Unlock Democracy, the bi-partisan campaign for political and constitutional reform, says that Gordon Brown's gestures towards changes in the voting system are "a textbook example of how not to do electoral reform."

  • 4 Jun 2009

    Hong Kong Cardinal Joseph Zen Ze-Kiun has urged China to change its stance on the crackdown 20 years ago against peaceful protesters in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. Today is the 20th anniversary of the crackdown.

  • 4 Jun 2009
  • 4 Jun 2009

    Cynicism about politicians and political institutions runs very deep, says Terry Waite. But the current crisis is also an opportunity for change, for reinvesting politics with hope and the participation of people from outside 'the party system'.

  • 4 Jun 2009

    Churches could have a vital role to play in rejuvenating democracy, says Jonathan Bartley. But it needs to be through a faith-engagement with politics based on openness and change.

  • 23 May 2009

    A public opinion poll by ComRes, commissioned by the religion and society thinktank Ekklesia, has challenged the Archbishop of Canterbury's suggestion that democracy will be damaged by the revelations about MPs expenses

  • 20 May 2009

    More churches and Christian groups in India have hailed as a victory for secular governance and a non-sectarian society the convincing victory of the ruling coalition, which did much better than pre-election polls had suggested.