critical religion

  • 3 Dec 2012

    In today's world we face a vast range of human practices which are overlapping and do not function as religious or secular solely or discreetly, says Francis Stewart. He illustrates this in relation to his extensive research into punk music.

  • 2 Dec 2012

    Eighty people came to Glasgow University Chapel for the launch of two important new books on religion on 21 November 2012.

  • 9 Nov 2012

    To coincide with the launch of the new Critical Religion Association website, Dr Timothy Fitzgerald, Reader in Languages, Cultures and Religions at the University of Stirling, reflects on the broadening of Critical Religion's work and perspective. Critiquing the beliefs-systems of self-regulating markets is a key way of interrogating and re-understanding the discursive spaces marked out by the terms 'religion' and 'politics', he suggests. [Ekklesia is a partner of the CRA]

  • 9 Nov 2012

    Today we are pleased to have launched the new Critical Religion Association and website (http://criticalreligion.org) - a new site, with many pages imported from a site hosted by the University of Stirling. That site still exists (http://www.criticalreligion.stir.ac.uk/), and is now exclusively about the Critical Religion Research Group (CRRG) based at Stirling. So why this new site?

  • 2 Nov 2012

    Critical Religion coordinator and Ekklesia associate Dr Michael Marten, from the University of Stirling, has been interviewed by Caitlin Smith for a BBC documentary, picking up on his research on Scottish missions in Palestine. The presenter is Angus Roxburgh.

  • 9 Oct 2012

    In this provocative reflection, Timothy Fitzgerald explains why he has become sceptical about the idea of a universal domain of politics, and what it means to claim that such a world exists. He begins to suggest that ‘the world of politics’ is as much a faith-imaginary as those beliefs typically attributed to ‘the world of religion’. Its questionable status is demonstrated by an ideological illusion that Fitzgerald looks at in his recent book, Religion and Politics in International Relations: the Modern Myth (Continuum, 2011). To be continued.

  • 9 Oct 2012

    Drawing on a public conversation at Edinburgh’s Festival of Spirituality and Peace on the theme ‘Disorganised Religion’ earlier this summer (2012), Michael Marten reflects on the nature of religion and the way it is morphing, changing and being challenged in the contemporary era.

  • 9 Oct 2012

    In written documentation from colonial times many indigenous authors are not victims only, but innovative individuals, bringing together their own belief forms with Christian traditions and thus creating genres and contents of their own and for their own objectives, says Sabine Dedenbach-Salazar.

  • 11 Sep 2012

    A popular educational website raises questions for Timothy Fitzgerald about the theoretical and methodological problems in isolating and defining a domain of politics or political science in the first place.

  • 8 Aug 2012

    A Church in the heart of Edinburgh is the venue for an intriguing conversation about the future of religion beyond its inherited institutional forms.