Education

  • 19 Apr 2012
  • 22 Mar 2012
  • 22 Mar 2012

    The Accord Coalition for inclusive education has expressed regret at the inward-looking focus of the Church of England’s ‘Church School of the Future’ report.

  • 1 Mar 2012

    While the direction of ‘impact statements’ is all about what the public is getting for its money, it says nothing about the bigger issues of impact that offend or contest common sense and sensibility and in which universities have always, in the past, taken a leading role. Dr Alison Jasper argues this point with regard to two icons of feminist religious and philosophical scholarship, Simone de Beauvoir and Mary Daly.

  • 19 Feb 2012

    Philippine-based Maryknoll nuns joined their counterparts in other parts of the world in celebrating their order's centenary this year and focusing on interfaith work.

  • 29 Jan 2012

    Democracy campaigners have warned schools that they may be breaking the law by taking part in uncritical celebrations of the Queen’s diamond jubilee.

  • 22 Nov 2011

    Ofsted’s latest annual report reveals widespread under-performance in primary schools' effectiveness in promoting community cohesion.

  • 21 Sep 2011

    The issue about creationism in schools is part of a wider set of misleadingly contructed arguments about religion and science, says Bob Carling. But ‘culture wars’ are often played out often by ignoring (or unfairly vilifying) those who take seriously the religious aspects of being human (and thus are theistic or agnostic) and who on the other hand take seriously the scientific evidence for evolution.

  • 20 Sep 2011

    Though their leaders may be at political odds with each other, a group of Israeli and Palestinian students learned that they can communicate through art.

  • 19 Sep 2011

    Creationism and ‘intelligent design’ are not scientific theories, but they are portrayed as such by some religious fundamentalists who attempt to have their views promoted in publicly-funded schools. There should be enforceable statutory guidance that they may not be presented as scientific theories in any publicly-funded school of whatever type, say a group of eminent scientists and science educators. They include an Anglican priest and they are backed by five organisations: three scientific, one secular humanist and one Christian.