misrepresentation

  • September 7, 2018

    “‘What is truth?’, said Jesting Pilate and would not stay for an answer.” Francis Bacon’s enduring comment on the frustrated Roman functionary, adjudicating the quar

  • February 10, 2018

    When the Work and Pensions Committee put out a call for evidence on PIP and ESA assessments, the response was overwhelming.

  • January 5, 2015

    For as long as there has been organised government, there has been satire. From Aristophanes to Steve Bell, power has been mocked: it is a mark of the spirit of freedom.

  • September 3, 2014

    Misrepresentation by government departments is an abuse of community, says Jill Segger. She suggests that the behaviour of the DWP not only contravenes the Cabinet Office guidance on goverment communications, but violates the commandment against bearing false witness.

  • March 13, 2014

    A couple of days ago, I sat in a packed church in a Cambridgeshire village to hear Rowan Williams speak about food banks. The former Archbishop of Canterbury was measured and carefully non-party political in his observations. His address was a model of the power which is exercised when discernment is coupled with commitment to truth and justice.

  • June 7, 2013

    An alliance of 11 churches has written to the Prime Minister demanding "an apology on behalf of the government for misrepresenting the poor."

  • April 6, 2013

    Hundreds of millionaire bankers will enjoy an extra £54,000 on average each year from 6 April 2013, thanks to a cut in the top UK tax rate (assuming they pay taxes here and opposition calculations are correct). A massive state bailout previously saved many banks, after their sector triggered an economic crisis in which numerous taxpayers suffered. By coincidence, Mick Philpott – whose crimes are being exploited by the Chancellor and Prime Minister to undermine the principle of social security – also apparently received £54,000 a year from public funds.

  • April 6, 2013

    The government’s war of words against disabled and badly-off people continues unchecked. The latest slurs by the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Prime Minister and the Minister for Disabled People suggest that UK politics has become a largely fact-free zone.