private schools make new bid for right to smack - news from ekklesia

By staff writers
December 2, 2004

Private schools make new bid for right to smack -2/12/04

Teachers and parents at independent private religious schools are taking their case to the House of Lords for the right of staff to smack pupils. The group, headed by the Christian Fellowship School in Liverpool, is appealing against rulings of the High Court and Court of Appeal that the law against corporal punishment, even in private schools, is not a breach of the European Convention on Human Rights, which protects freedom to practise religious beliefs. Differences of opinion amongst Christians emerged during recent debates in Parliament, over whether parents should be allowed to hit their children, with conservative Evangelicals saying that they should. Several mainstream Christian denominations, bishops, and children's charities however maintain that smacking is an act of violence. and should therefore be opposed. Two years ago, forty schools, again spearheaded by the Christian Fellowship School in Liverpool, were defeated in their bid to get a change in the law to allow them to use corporal punishment.

Private schools make new bid for right to smack -2/12/04

Teachers and parents at independent private religious schools are taking their case to the House of Lords for the right of staff to smack pupils. The group, headed by the Christian Fellowship School in Liverpool, is appealing against rulings of the High Court and Court of Appeal that the law against corporal punishment, even in private schools, is not a breach of the European Convention on Human Rights, which protects freedom to practise religious beliefs. Differences of opinion amongst Christians emerged during recent debates in Parliament, over whether parents should be allowed to hit their children, with conservative Evangelicals saying that they should. Several mainstream Christian denominations, bishops, and children's charities however maintain that smacking is an act of violence. and should therefore be opposed. Two years ago, forty schools, again spearheaded by the Christian Fellowship School in Liverpool, were defeated in their bid to get a change in the law to allow them to use corporal punishment.

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