Faith leaders meet to step up poverty alleviation - news from ekklesia

By staff writers
September 12, 2005

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Faith leaders meet to step up poverty alleviation

-12/09/05

More than 30 leaders of Christian denominations, representing one-third of the worldís population, are meeting in Washinston to call for a stepped-up role of the religious sector in alleviating extreme poverty and affirming the United Nationsí Millennium Development Goals.

The result of the meeting, officially known as the ìConsultation of Religious Leaders on Global Poverty,î will be a communiquÈ outlining concrete steps by which the Christian churches can increase collaboration between governments and themselves to increase the effectiveness of their work for the poor.

It comes after the Primate of the Episcopal Church launched a stinging attack on proposed revisions to UN poverty-reduction strategies made by the United States.

The event opened with a series of worship services and lectures in the Cathedral nave, including a speech by Dr. Jeffrey Sachs, director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University and special advisor to U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan.

Yesterday evening, the faith leaders entered closed consultative sessions that will extend into Tuesday, after which a delegation will travel to New York to present the groupís official communiquÈ to the U.N.

The consultation is the inaugural event of the Center for Global Justice and Reconciliation at Washington National Cathedral.

It is an international, multi-denominational meeting convened by the South African Archbishop, The Most Rev. Njongonkulu W. H. Ndungane of South Africa.

His Roman Catholic counterpart from Nairobi, The Most Rev. Raphael Ndingi Mwanaía Nzeki is also participating along with 30 plus high-ranking faith leaders from the Northern and Southern hemispheres representing Anglican, Roman Catholic, Reformed, Methodist, Evangelical, Lutheran, Greek Orthodox, and Seventh-day Adventist denominations.

Find books now:

Faith leaders meet to step up poverty alleviation

-12/09/05

More than 30 leaders of Christian denominations, representing one-third of the world's population, are meeting in Washinston to call for a stepped-up role of the religious sector in alleviating extreme poverty and affirming the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals.

The result of the meeting, officially known as the 'Consultation of Religious Leaders on Global Poverty,' will be a communiquÈ outlining concrete steps by which the Christian churches can increase collaboration between governments and themselves to increase the effectiveness of their work for the poor.

It comes after the Primate of the Episcopal Church launched a stinging attack on proposed revisions to UN poverty-reduction strategies made by the United States.

The event opened with a series of worship services and lectures in the Cathedral nave, including a speech by Dr. Jeffrey Sachs, director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University and special advisor to U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan.

Yesterday evening, the faith leaders entered closed consultative sessions that will extend into Tuesday, after which a delegation will travel to New York to present the group's official communiquÈ to the U.N.

The consultation is the inaugural event of the Center for Global Justice and Reconciliation at Washington National Cathedral.

It is an international, multi-denominational meeting convened by the South African Archbishop, The Most Rev. Njongonkulu W. H. Ndungane of South Africa.

His Roman Catholic counterpart from Nairobi, The Most Rev. Raphael Ndingi Mwana'a Nzeki is also participating along with 30 plus high-ranking faith leaders from the Northern and Southern hemispheres representing Anglican, Roman Catholic, Reformed, Methodist, Evangelical, Lutheran, Greek Orthodox, and Seventh-day Adventist denominations.

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