Kember notes irony of non-violent release by soldiers

By staff writers
April 15, 2006

Kember notes irony of non-violent release by soldiers

-15/04/06

In his first broadcast interview since his release, freed British hostage Norman Kember has said that he "continues to thank" those involved in his nonviolent rescue.

In an emotional interview with the BBC's Fergal Keane, he breaks down in tears as he describes the moment that the SAS entered the house unopposed, after the kidnappers had left.

Upon his release from captivity, almost immediately there were accusations that Kember had failed to thank his rescuers, despite his clearly traumatised condition.

General Sir Michael Jackson, a very senior British Army representative, spoke to ITN and Channel 4 News the day after the release. He alleged that Dr Kember had not shown gratitude to his rescuers and said he was ìsaddenedî by this.

However he then qualified his statement by saying that a thank-you may have been issued, but if so he was not aware of it.

Ekklesia later sought clarification from the Ministry of Defence (MOD) and was told on 27th March by a MOD spokesperson; "information about the thanks had not filtered through to the MOD when General Sir Michael Jackson made his statement".

In an interview broadcast today at 9.00pm on BBC Radio 4's 'Taking a Stand' programme Kember noted the irony of his release and said of the soldiers; "They were brave. I disagree with their profession, but it is ironic isn't it - you go as a peace activist and you are rescued by the SAS, which is perhaps the most violent of all the British forces."

During the interview Kember did not directly address the various reports carried by the Guardian newspaper and others that there were two groups involved in the kidnapping, which may have had a falling out, and may have led to the information being passed to the US military about where the hostages were.

Kember notes irony of non-violent release by soldiers

-15/04/06

In his first broadcast interview since his release, freed British hostage Norman Kember has said that he "continues to thank" those involved in his nonviolent rescue.

In an emotional interview with the BBC's Fergal Keane, he breaks down in tears as he describes the moment that the SAS entered the house unopposed, after the kidnappers had left.

Upon his release from captivity, almost immediately there were accusations that Kember had failed to thank his rescuers, despite his clearly traumatised condition.

General Sir Michael Jackson, a very senior British Army representative, spoke to ITN and Channel 4 News the day after the release. He alleged that Dr Kember had not shown gratitude to his rescuers and said he was ìsaddenedî by this.

However he then qualified his statement by saying that a thank-you may have been issued, but if so he was not aware of it.

Ekklesia later sought clarification from the Ministry of Defence (MOD) and was told on 27th March by a MOD spokesperson; "information about the thanks had not filtered through to the MOD when General Sir Michael Jackson made his statement".

In an interview broadcast today at 9.00pm on BBC Radio 4's 'Taking a Stand' programme Kember noted the irony of his release and said of the soldiers; "They were brave. I disagree with their profession, but it is ironic isn't it - you go as a peace activist and you are rescued by the SAS, which is perhaps the most violent of all the British forces."

During the interview Kember did not directly address the various reports carried by the Guardian newspaper and others that there were two groups involved in the kidnapping, which may have had a falling out, and may have led to the information being passed to the US military about where the hostages were.

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