Insurance policy found to be virgin on the ridiculous

By staff writers
June 26, 2006

Insurance policy found to be virgin on the ridiculous

-26/06/06

A UK-based insurance company has withdrawn an eccentric £1 million insurance policy from three chaste Christian sisters who wanted special coverage for costs of bringing up a child if one of them was able to conceive immaculately.

The burden of proof that any baby they gave birth to was the product of a virginal conception had rested with the women alone, according to a spokesperson for Britishinsurance.com in Braintree, Essex.

The company eventually decided to withdraw their cover after receiving complaints from Catholics that it was ìin poor tasteî. The clients themselves were based in Inverness, in the north of Scotland.

Simon Burgess, Britishinsuranceís managing director, explained: ìOur company used to specialise in weird and wonderful policies, and this was one of themÖ The Catholic Church was not happy about what we've been doing.î

He added that the company was not usually in the business of withdrawing policies, however odd.

References to the virginal conception of Jesus are contained in independent sources in St Matthew 1.18-25 and St Luke 1.26-38. There is no comparable reference in St Mark, the earliest synoptic Gospel, or in St John or in the writings of St Paul, who simply refers to Jesus as ìborn of a woman, under the lawî in Galatians 4.4.

Some argue that the idea (frequently misrendered ëvirgin birthí) arose because of an erroneous Septuagint misattribution in St Matthew of a Hebrew word (ëalmah) meaning ìa young woman of marriageable ageî for ëbethulahí, meaning virgin.

The Christian churches have traditionally upheld the doctrine as pointing to the way Jesus Christ embodies both full humanity and full divinity, though a minority says that it is neither theologically necessary nor biologically coherent in this regard.

Neither proponents nor detractors of the notion seem to mention insurance, three mothers or Inverness in their accounts.

[Also on Ekklesia: Charity launches free debt help guide; Falling markets cost charities billions; Descendants of slaves seek justice from Lloyds; Church avoids fresh storm over rare snoozing bats; Faith just isn't in the jeans for Polish Church; House prices website - get house price information available]

Insurance policy found to be virgin on the ridiculous

-26/06/06

A UK-based insurance company has withdrawn an eccentric £1 million insurance policy from three chaste Christian sisters who wanted special coverage for costs of bringing up a child if one of them was able to conceive immaculately.

The burden of proof that any baby they gave birth to was the product of a virginal conception had rested with the women alone, according to a spokesperson for Britishinsurance.com in Braintree, Essex.

The company eventually decided to withdraw their cover after receiving complaints from Catholics that it was ìin poor tasteî. The clients themselves were based in Inverness, in the north of Scotland.

Simon Burgess, Britishinsuranceís managing director, explained: ìOur company used to specialise in weird and wonderful policies, and this was one of themÖ The Catholic Church was not happy about what we've been doing.î

He added that the company was not usually in the business of withdrawing policies, however odd.

References to the virginal conception of Jesus are contained in independent sources in St Matthew 1.18-25 and St Luke 1.26-38. There is no comparable reference in St Mark, the earliest synoptic Gospel, or in St John or in the writings of St Paul, who simply refers to Jesus as ìborn of a woman, under the lawî in Galatians 4.4.

Some argue that the idea (frequently misrendered ëvirgin birthí) arose because of an erroneous Septuagint misattribution in St Matthew of a Hebrew word (ëalmah) meaning ìa young woman of marriageable ageî for ëbethulahí, meaning virgin.

The Christian churches have traditionally upheld the doctrine as pointing to the way Jesus Christ embodies both full humanity and full divinity, though a minority says that it is neither theologically necessary nor biologically coherent in this regard.

Neither proponents nor detractors of the notion seem to mention insurance, three mothers or Inverness in their accounts.

[Also on Ekklesia: Charity launches free debt help guide; Falling markets cost charities billions; Descendants of slaves seek justice from Lloyds; Church avoids fresh storm over rare snoozing bats; Faith just isn't in the jeans for Polish Church; House prices website - get house price information available]

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