The latest news from ekklesia on theology and politics from a christian perspective

The latest news from ekklesia on theology and politics from a christian perspective

By staff writers
2 Jul 2003

Case against user who said cannabis was God's gift to be dropped

-2/7/03

The case against a multiple sclerosis sufferer who said that cannabis was ìgodís giftî is expected to be dropped.

It is understood the Crown will tell Kirkwall Sheriff Court in Orkney that it will not proceed because of Elizabeth Ivol's health, reports the BBC.

Mrs Ivol, also known as Biz, of South Ronaldsay, has spoken of her disappointment at the move.

She had wanted to use the case to publicise her campaign for the legalisation of medical cannabis, which she said is the only drug which eases her pain.

Charged with growing and handling cannabis she said that the drug was a ìGod given plantî which brought relief from the pain of her crippling multiple sclerosis.

Groups such as the Evangelical Alliance however have previously made it clear that whilst cannabis is part of God's creation, they do not believe that it should be legalised.

Mrs Ivol, who uses a wheelchair, had denied three charges in relation to the handling of cannabis when she appeared at Kirkwall Sheriff Court.

She has said her life would not be worth living without the drug.

During her trial, Mrs Ivol told the court she came up with the idea for what she called her "special Belgian chocolates" after agreeing to help a non-smoking MS sufferer.

She developed a formula for the drug-laced confectionery as well as cannabis patches which can be directly applied to the skin.

Mrs Ivol added that she had tried a long list of legal medication supplied by her doctor but claimed some of the drugs had "horrific" side effects.

The court heard her day-to-day life had become almost unbearable since she was diagnosed with the incurable condition in the early 1990s.

Mrs Ivol said: "At the moment I feel like somebody's pulling barbed wire through my spine.

"I have muscle spasms and my eyesight's failing but it has not gone yet. It is very, very painful."

"I'm completely and utterly paralysed from the neck down, more or less."

She said she resisted using cannabis for two years because of the stigma attached to the drug, but eventually gave in and began smoking one cannabis joint each evening.

Case against user who said cannabis was God's gift to be dropped

-2/7/03

The case against a multiple sclerosis sufferer who said that cannabis was ìgodís giftî is expected to be dropped.

It is understood the Crown will tell Kirkwall Sheriff Court in Orkney that it will not proceed because of Elizabeth Ivol's health, reports the BBC.

Mrs Ivol, also known as Biz, of South Ronaldsay, has spoken of her disappointment at the move.

She had wanted to use the case to publicise her campaign for the legalisation of medical cannabis, which she said is the only drug which eases her pain.

Charged with growing and handling cannabis she said that the drug was a ìGod given plantî which brought relief from the pain of her crippling multiple sclerosis.

Groups such as the Evangelical Alliance however have previously made it clear that whilst cannabis is part of God's creation, they do not believe that it should be legalised.

Mrs Ivol, who uses a wheelchair, had denied three charges in relation to the handling of cannabis when she appeared at Kirkwall Sheriff Court.

She has said her life would not be worth living without the drug.

During her trial, Mrs Ivol told the court she came up with the idea for what she called her "special Belgian chocolates" after agreeing to help a non-smoking MS sufferer.

She developed a formula for the drug-laced confectionery as well as cannabis patches which can be directly applied to the skin.

Mrs Ivol added that she had tried a long list of legal medication supplied by her doctor but claimed some of the drugs had "horrific" side effects.

The court heard her day-to-day life had become almost unbearable since she was diagnosed with the incurable condition in the early 1990s.

Mrs Ivol said: "At the moment I feel like somebody's pulling barbed wire through my spine.

"I have muscle spasms and my eyesight's failing but it has not gone yet. It is very, very painful."

"I'm completely and utterly paralysed from the neck down, more or less."

She said she resisted using cannabis for two years because of the stigma attached to the drug, but eventually gave in and began smoking one cannabis joint each evening.

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