US Anabaptists come out against depleted uranium weapons

By staff writers
17 Jul 2007

A resolution against the use of depleted uranium weapons has been issued by the Church of the Brethren General Board. The action from the US Anabaptist came at a meeting held in conjunction with the Church of the Brethren Annual Conference in Cleveland, Ohio.

Declaring the use of depleted uranium weapons to be "a specific and compelling example of the sinfulness of war," the resolution appeals for a halt to their manufacture, lifts up efforts of Christian Peacemaker Teams and the World Council of Churches with regard to depleted uranium weapons, and directs the Brethren Witness/Washington Office to advocate for elimination of such weapons, among other actions.

Phil Jones, director of the Brethren Witness/Washington Office, introduced the resolution as a partnership with Christian Peacemaker Teams and the World Council of Churches, which both have worked against depleted uranium weapons and/or have made statements regarding use of the weapons.

The resolution states that "the primary danger of using depleted uranium in weapons comes from breathing in the depleted uranium dust created by burning or exploded weaponry, or from ingesting depleted uranium dust that has contaminated the food or water supply. A growing body of evidence suggests such exposure may increase a person's cancer risk and cause birth defects."

The Church of the Brethren is a Christian denomination committed to continuing the work of Jesus peacefully and simply, and to living out its faith in community. It is based in the Anabaptist and Pietist faith traditions and is one of the three Historic Peace Churches.

It celebrates its 300th anniversary in 2008. The COB counts almost 130,000 members across the US and Puerto Rico, and has missions and sister churches in Nigeria, the Dominican Republic, Brazil, Haiti, and India.

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